Available from Amazon.com:
Chest Deep and Risingws
Chest Deep and Rising:
The Hurricane Katrina Nightmare

by Patrick Yoes
Published by Ithaca Press
August 2006

Description from Ithaca Press:
Immersed in floodwaters and uncertainty, while receiving exaggerated news reports, the senses of first responders werer challenged at every turn. Chest Deep and Rising tells of a nightmare that lasted 16 intense days, as seen through the eyes of law enforcement officers throughout the entire New Orleans metropolitan area. It is a story of bravery, heroic acts, and selfless devotion by America's first responders during a time when local, state, and federal services failed to adequately support these heroes. It was a time when the law enforcement community took charge and supported their counterparts with supplies and manpower. This is the story of just a few of the many heroes of Hurricane Katrina.

A portion of the proceeds from the sale of this book will go to the National Fraternal Order of Police Charitable Foundation, which is responsible for a wide range of worthy causes, including the Nation Peace Officers Memorial Service held annually in Washington, DC, and the Fraternal Order of Police Disaster Fund. For additional information on this fund, please visit www.fop.net.


About the Author:
Patrick Yoes is a lifelong resident of St. Charles Parish, located 20 miles west of the City of New Orleans, Louisiana. Employed by the St. Charles Sheriff's Office since 1984, Patrick has oversight of the department's Special Services Division, responsible for Community Outreach programs, and is the department's Public Information Officer. During his career with the Sheriff's Department, Patrick has worked as a patrol deputy, patrol sergeant, and detective in a department that serves as the sole law enforcement agency for St. Charles Parish's 50,000 residents.


Comments from The Patriot Resource:
The book almost reads like a journal, covering the first sixteen days following Hurricane Katrina's arrival in southeastern Louisiana. The biggest asset of Patrick Yoes's book is that it's a first-hand account by someone who was on the front line as a first responder when the hurricane arrived and in its aftermath. Though occasionally blunt, the author avoids being sensational or graphic which lends this book to appealing to a wider audience. Even so, one can't help but wonder what details and encounters from those sixteen intense days that Mr. Yoes might have chosen to leave out.



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